The Versatility of The Gluten Free Diet

Gluten-free diet is a diet primarily for those with gluten-sensitive enteropathy commonly known as Celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, and gluten-intolerance. But for some it might even be believed to be a “miracle diet”, one  which will make you less susceptible to various lifestyle diseases where gluten is allegedly to blame.

But aside from Celiac disease, where can we actually legitimately apply the gluten-free diet?

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Wheat and Gluten Allergy

Though the two are not the same, gluten-free diet can be applied to both since basically, gluten is a protein found in wheat, among other sources. Therefore, a gluten-free product is safe for those who have either of the two allergies since most gluten-free items do not contain wheat, as well. 

So, if ever have a loved one who has wheat allergy, substituting the regular wheat based food items with gluten-free ones would really help[1]. However, it is always safest to still check the ingredients of gluten-free meals you buy. 

Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

As the name suggests, this condition may have similar gluten sensitivity symptoms to Celiac’s disease, but does not directly link to Celiac disease In fact, this NCGS is a curious case to medical researchers to date, and still there are questions whether gluten is to blame for this condition.

Though the correlation might not be clear for now, one certain thing as of the moment is that someone with NCGS can try a gluten-free diet to see if certain symptoms that they experience, similar to those with Celiac disease, can be eased[2].

Gluten Ataxia

In contrast to Celiac disease, Gluten Ataxia on the other hand attacks the cerebellum in our brain which is responsible for our body coordination and balance. People with such disease experience difficulty in complex movements such as walking, writing, talking and even swallowing.

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In this condition, gluten-free diet has been proven handy to avoid such abnormal immunological responses[3].

We will add more to this list next time. But for now, if you know some people with this condition, sharing this piece would really make a difference.

Got questions anything related to gluten or gluten-free diet? Don’t hesitate to comment below! We”ll absolutely be glad to help!

Sources:

1) “Wheat allergy.” ACAAI Public Website, 21 Jan. 2016. Web. 6 Jan. 2017.

2.) 4310830, 95 -. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Celiac Disease Foundation, 1998. Web. 6 Jan. 2017.

3.) Hadjivassiliou, M, et al. “Dietary Treatment of Gluten Ataxia.” Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry 74.9 (2003): 1221–1224. Web. 19 Jan. 2017.

 

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