Quick Tips For Gluten-Free Shopping

To avoid gluten, you basically need to stay away from its sources:  wheat, barley, rye, and triticale. But in a world where cross-contamination and food additives are a norm, here are some quick and dirty tips to keep your gluten-free shopping and meal planning easier and simpler. Keep this in your backpocket at all times to keep safe against gluten.

Go Natural

  • Fruits: fresh, frozen or canned.

Double Check: For dried fruit, check the label for gluten containing additives

  • Vegetables: fresh, frozen, or canned.

Double Check: Frozen potatoes are not always gluten-free. Read the label for additives.

  • Meats: fresh, or frozen.

Double check: marinated, or processed meats like your sausages, tocino, tapa. Check label  for additives.

  • Cheese & Dairy: all-natural cheese are naturally gluten-free.

Double Check: processed cheese, like cheese spreads

  • Nuts & Seeds: unseasoned or in shell. 

Double Check: seasoned cocktail nuts and seeds

  • -Beverages: 100% fruit or veggie juice, water. Avoid malted drinks and beer.

Double Check: yogurt, pre-mixed shakes, cholocate and milk drinks, smoothies 

Befriend the Label

FDA only allows packaged foods with less than 20ppm of gluten to be labeled “gluten-free” , so this is a good guide. But even without the gluten-free food stamp, some packaging already add helpful information on their labels, so you may know which ones to stay away from. Check the label if it has been manufactured in the same facility that also processes food containing gluten, or if the product may contain gluten.

Know What To Look For

BUT without the gluten-free label still in most packaged foods today, grocery shopping can be a much more complicated task than  we may like.  To make it easier, first, check for obvious gluten sources:

  •  Wheat
  • Barley
  • Rye
  • Triticale
  • Malt
  • Brewer’s yeast
  • Oats (unless specifically labeled gluten-free)

Then, the less obvious terminology that means the same :

  • Triticum vulgare (wheat)
  • Triticale (cross between wheat and rye)
  • Hordeum vulgare (barley)
  • Secale cereale (rye)
  • Triticum spelta (spelt, a form of wheat)

And look for the following terms represent ingredients that always contain gluten:

  • Wheat protein/hydrolyzed wheat protein
  • Wheat starch/hydrolyzed wheat starch (wheat)
  • Wheat flour/bread flour/bleached flour(wheat)
  • Bulgur (a form of wheat)
  • Malt (made from barley)
  • Couscous (made from wheat)
  • Farina (made from wheat)
  • Pasta (made from wheat unless otherwise indicated)
  • Seitan (made from wheat gluten and commonly used in vegetarian meals)
  • Wheat or barley grass (will be cross-contaminated)
  • Wheat germ oil or extract (will be cross-contaminated)
  • Vegetable protein/hydrolyzed vegetable protein (can come from wheat, corn or soy)
  • Modified starch/modified food starch (can come from several sources, including wheat)
  • Natural flavor/natural flavoring (can come from barley)
  • Artificial flavor/artificial flavoring (can come from barley)
  • Caramel color (now considered a safe ingredient, but if you’re in doubt, check with the manufacturer)
  • Modified food starch
  • Hydrolyzed plant protein/HPP
  • Hydrolyzed vegetable protein/HVP
  • Seasonings
  • Flavorings
  • Vegetable starch
  • Dextrin and Maltodextrin (both sometimes made from wheat)[1]

Make your next grocery shopping experience a less stressful and less overwhelming task by being prepared. Let us know how it works out in the comments!

References:

1 Anderson, Jane. “What Terms on a Food Label Really Mean ‘Gluten’?” Verywell Health, Verywell Health, 7 July 2019, http://www.verywellhealth.com/how-to-identify-gluten-on-food-labels-562666.

 

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