How to Deal With Emotions Being Newly Gluten-Free

emotion in gluten free bread

It’s the second month of 2019. How are you holding up on your gluten-free diet? 🙂

We know. Taking on a diet that is different from everyone else’s can be a challenge.

Being diagnosed with Celiac disease, or non-Celiac gluten intolerance is a positive development, since formerly mysterious symptoms that you experience can now be controlled, and you can finally take charge and live a healthier life. But with this new realization come emotions that you also in a very real way have to battle with on a daily basis: from frustration of not being able to eat what you want, to the anxiety of being excluded. 

So, how do you cope? 

The Restaurant Anxiety

sadgirlglutenfree

You don’t want to be thought of as a picky eater. As a matter of fact, you want other people to be comfortable around you while dining out. Or at least, not to be a consideration for others all the time, whenever you are dining out with friends or co-workers. This can be a cause of major anxiety for someone new to a diet not adhered to by most people around them. The feeling of social exclusion can be wearing. 

How to Deal:

Consciously and actively remind yourself of the positive effects of taking on your new diet. You would no longer have to deal with the symptoms such as headaches or diarrhea, and you are actually doing something to be healthy. Keeping a journal to write down things you are grateful for in this diet, can be a major help. If you are not used to journaling, simply creating a bulleted list tucked away in your phone, which you could peruse when you feel anxiety bubbling up, could be the difference between an anxious lunch and a relaxed one.

If you are not yet very skilled in scouting what’s gluten-free on a standard menu, make some time to know which Gluten Free restaurants are in your school or around your workplace. In a group setting, there will almost always be a pause to consider where the group is dining out. Occasionally be the one to suggest a place where you know there are options for you. A place where people with regular diets can be comfortable, too. Focus on the fact that you are simply suggesting somewhere to eat, not being picky. Other people may even thank you for being quick about it.

Frustration: I can no longer eat everything I want.

minimuffinonhand
Frustration of not being able to eat what you want is one of the major emotions to deal with when first starting out on a gluten-free diet. You have done your research and now have the list of what to eat nailed down. But along with that is acquiring an even more vast knowledge of what you cannot have. Watching other family members chow down a nice regular sandwich or that delicious cake is an experience you will be very familiar with.

How to Deal: Realize that flavor is not synonymous with gluten. There are delicious gluten-free options available for you, as well. As you get more acquainted with this new diet, you will very soon try a myriad of different food options that will be very agreeable with your taste buds, as well as your diet. Food that you will even crave for. That sandwich? You can have one at home with your own gluten-free bread. That cake, well think, “I’ll buy one from that gluten-free place I know, or even make it one better: I will make one myself in that yam flavor I cannot get just anywhere. It will be delicious.”

The Grocery Battlefield

girl in gluten free shopping in store

Unarmed, it can be very intimidating walking into a grocery store not knowing what to put in your shopping cart. Looking at the back labels of food can make your grocery shopping take twice as long.  It can leave you shrouded in misery going up and down the aisles looking for but not finding exactly the things you need. It’s not unusual to feel yourself welling up with the overwhelming emotion and stress of it all.

How to Deal:  Firstly, know your enemy. You can read our previous post on what to watch out for in a Filipino grocery store, such as stealth gluten. Being fluent in gluten vocabulary can immediately shrink the stress of complicated food label reading in half. Easily spot gluten, and easily eliminate it.  You can also make this chore more convenient by first doing some scouting online. You can have gluten free food delivered to you at home from shops that offer a wide range of gluten-free options and can drop it right to your doorstep.

Being on this new gluten-free diet is a definite change and you would have to deal with different emotions that go along with it. But at the end of  the day, what would make this gluten-free transition a lot easier for you is allowing yourself to lean into them. Everyone on this diet will have similar experiences as you. Just like gluten in your diet, you can take control of it and soon eliminate them from your life. 

How do you deal with your own emotions in this diet? Feel free to share it with us in the comments! 🙂

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Sugar-free & Gluten-free Ideas for Halloween!

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In our diet, it’s not always just gluten we’re worried about, right? On Halloween, along with our concern for gluten, we also have  just as important, if not much more pressing health concern during this time of the year: sugar.

Parents out there, tempting as it may be to let loose a bit and let your kids go with all the rainbow colors of candy, we must remember that too much sugar has actual consequences to a child’s health.

It is not just the sugar rush that we’re talking about. Sugar has a much more negative effect on the body that is important for us to know.

image4Dental decay is an obvious one. Sugar is known to speed up breakdown of teeth as it fuels the bad bacteria in the mouth. Though younger kids naturally lose their baby teeth, it is important to take care of them as you would permanent ones as the bacteria on the surface of baby teeth can attack the healthy ones still under the gum surface, which can adversely affect their growth by the time they’re ready to come out.

Study also finds sugar lowers the immune system to up to five hours after consumption. Ever notice that close to midnight or when you’ve been up all night, eating sweets has the effect of making your throat scratchy and making you feel like you’re coming down with something? That’s because sugar curbs immune system cells that attack bad bacteria in our bodies.

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Sugar as fructose  and glucose that are in abundance in Halloween candy also has the effect of make one feel famished. Munching on sweets makes your brain resist leptin, which is the protein that help signal the body that it is full. Anytime sweets are introduced in the diet, it makes it easier to eat too much. Partnered with the fact that sugar is highly addictive, it can lead to complications and diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Though Halloween is just one night a year, letting kids loose on sugar, and having candy in the cookie jar for weeks after, can introduce kids to sugar eating habits and that would be extremely harmful for them in the long run.

Here are a few tips to make this Halloween a little less about the sugar and a bit more about the fun:

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Consider giving out inedible treats like Halloween accessories like glow sticks, colorful bracelets, that they can have fun with while out in the streets at night. Just remember not to give out things that little kids can choke on. You don’t have to worry about  sugar here, and gluten, even.

 

 

Have the tradition of a contest of who can bring home the most candy. That way, kids will have the motivation not to eat any of the candy until they get home, so that you may get a handle on what and how much sweets your kids actually consume.

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Though a bit more out of the way, if you are visiting houses of people you actually know, like friends or relatives, have a deal with them to give out healthier and sugar-free (and gluten-free!) treats to your kids, or prepare something you yourself approve of, and hand them out to house owners before you set out for the night with your kids. It can just be between adults.

Remember that sweets and edibles during Halloween can just be a portion of the fun. Make other fun highlights such as creating costumes, decorating, and storytelling with your kids, that will focus more on the activities rather than the sweets.

Remember, with your kids health on the line it pays to keep the effort to be healthy even on Halloween. 🙂

Mother and Daughter Painting a Pumpkin

 

References:

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Albert Sanchez, J. L. Reeser, H. S. Lau, P. Y. Yahiku, R. E. Willard, P. J. McMillan, S. Y. Cho, A. R. Magie, and U. D. Register. – Role of sugars in human neutrophilic phagocytosis. – The American Society for Clinical Nutrition, Inc. 1973., Copyright © 1973,http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/26/11/1180.abstract\

The Skimy on Obesity – UCTV Prime http://www.uctv.tv/search-details.aspx?showID=23717

 

Quick & Easy Breakfast Ideas

Let’s face it: most of us hardly ever have time for a proper meal in the morning. Whether it is to squeeze in a few extra minutes of shuteye before heading off to our day, or our to-do lists are simply too long  to make room for a pause in the morning. So, we racked up a few practical ideas here that you can try as quick breakfast options sans the need to deal with your gluten allergy, or celiac disease symptoms. It’s important to keep your energy high first thing in the morning to get things done, don’t you agree? And gluten should be one less thing to worry about at this most important meal of the day.

Eggs

gluten free breakfast eggs with asparagus

Sunny side up, scrambled, or made into a nice omelette, you cannot go wrong with this breakfast item. You can mix in your selection of veggies, add basic spices and herbs and you can have a filling meal in a matter of minutes. A quick trick is to boil a couple of eggs, peel them, dice and mix in with tomatoes, asparagus, a pinch of salt and pepper, and you’re good to go. Healthy, quick, and hassle-free.

Fruits

gluten free breakfast fruits

This seems like a no-brainer but if your time is scarce, you can forget a basic gluten-free item like this. Ready to eat fruits are convenient, and the quickest of quick meals. Make a berries mix, or grab a convenient apple, or a couple of bananas, or dalandan (they’re one of the remaining cheap ones you can find around street markets or groceries around Metro Manila), before going out to run your errands. If you’re really pressed for time, you can finish these while on a drive, or at your desk at work.

Gluten-free pancakes and waffles

gluten free pancakes with raspberries

This is great if you have gluten-free flour lying around. If not, you can also do mashed banana, mixed with gluten-free oat flour, and eggs as replacement. Fry these in a bit of oil, add some berries, or pour into your waffle maker and finish with syrup. You can even make a sandwich out of these with nice spread or fruit filling. Pack them in sandwich bags and you’re done!

Gluten Free Sandwich or Toast

gluten free sandwich

Gluten-free breads are now thankfully easier to come by. Drop by your healthy food store or look for gluten-free breads online. We have a selection for you at GERALD.ph and you can get them home delivered. If you’re serious about eliminating gluten,  this should already be a staple item in your pantry.  Spread a nice jelly filling, peanut or other nut butters, or chocolate spreads. 

Why not try these to rev up your day unglutened? Let us know how it works out! 🙂

Fight Hunger Pangs Safely with Gluten Free To-Go Meals

One of the more challenging things to confront when dealing with food intolerance and sensitivities are the moments when your caught unprepared hungry. (You know that feeling when you just have to eat something or you’ll pass out?) This occurrence is pretty common and sad to say, this is also when we’re more susceptible to ingesting gluten, because there simply isn’t time to be picky!

Avoiding this can be done with sufficient meal planning, and always having your go-to food item in your fridge, or in your bag, prepared wherever you may be. Here are some terrific ideas you can try so that the next time your stomach grumbles, you’re covered.

  1. Food Wraps

This is terrifically easy to make in advance. Make 4 to 5 wraps, put them in a lunch pack, or a zip lock bag, and save them in your fridge for later.  Lettuce wraps, with seasoned and sauteed meat, and seafood, with a little gluten-free dressing, is a convenient option.

gluten free wrap
Image: EatingWell.com

 

Here’s a great recipe from Eating Well that you can try out:  Gluten-Free Peanut-Chicken Cabbage Wraps.

  1. Sandwiches

Gluten-free sliced bread is heaven sent for these food grubbing moments. If you have gluten-free spreads on hand, just slather it on your bread and you’re good to go. There are a lot of excellent gluten-free spreads options around, more common are are peanut butter, gluten-free chocolate spreads.

gluten free sandwiches

A great selection of gluten-free breads and spreads ise available here.

 

  1. Gluten-free bite-sized cookies and muffins

glutenfree muffins

Bite-sized snacks are great to take with you wherever you go. You don’t have to worry about them spoiling even days at a time in your bag. Put a jar of cookies on your desk at work, or a bag of muffins in your gym bag. Rice cakes or breads made with almond flour or sorghum flour instead of wheat are great. Delicious for nibbling, and guaranteed won’t make you sick because they are already tried and tested.

  1. Naturally Gluten-free snacks

If you want to minimize processed food, it is a smart thing to go with naturally gluten-free food so that you also don’t consume way more sugar, salt or additives that aren’t really necessary, just to address your hunger pangs. Have a piece of fruit handy in your bag, those that pack easily in your bag like an orange of a piece of apple. Try also bags of unseasoned nuts or seeds.

apple and orange gluten free snacks

  1. Meal Plan

If you know exactly what you are having daily for the next few days, and already have them prepared during the weekend, then you can definitely minimize the risk of untimely hunger. Having complete sets of meals for the day already planned out: breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks in between, will make sure you’re complete satiated for the rest of the day.

The Celiac Disease Foundation has on their site a 7-day gluten-free meal plan that you can use as guide for your own planning.

Excellent! So next time you are feeling hungry, save yourself from another episode of enduring effects of gluten ingestion.

Was this list helpful? If you have your own suggestion from experience of how to safely coast through the day gluten-free, give us a shout out in the comments! 🙂 Have a great weekend, everyone! 

Weight Watching: What to expect on a Gluten-Free Diet

Since going gluten-free involves switching up one’s diet, most people are bound to experience a difference in their weight. What changes can we actually expect? To help, we’ve provided here the 3 possible routes your weight can take on your gluten-free journey.

lady thinking about gluten free diet

  1. The Good – Weight Gain

In Celiac Disease, because of the damage your intestinal walls go through over time, the body loses its efficient natural ability to take nourishment from the food it consumes. Someone who has had this disease, and has not been diagnosed for a long period (which may very well be a decade or more), may be extremely underweight, as a result. Or if not , they may have difficulty in maintaining healthy weight, because of the challenge this disease poses for nutrient and calorie absorption.  

After getting diagnosed and taking measures to improve your condition, by eliminating gluten, for one, the body can then heal itself. Your intestines can gradually once again absorb the nutrients, and calories from the food you eat. Your small intestines will hopefully improve its function, and  as a result you will experience weight gain as your body absorbs the benefits from the food it consumes. This weight gain is great news! It is important for the body to maintain a healthy weight to make sure your it performs optimally.

  1. The Bad Weight Gain, And Good Weight Loss  

man running

However, Dr. Vikki Peterson, a doctor publishing specialized content on gluten relevant concerns, explains that there is also another case where the body may react differently. In gluten sensitivity, wherein the damage is not as severe as those in Celiac disease, but where the body is still very reactive to gluten, the manifestation instead could be the opposite. Sensing your body is not able to gain nourishment from the food it consumes, it can hold on to what you give it by not wanting to burn anything. This results a decrease in metabolic rate, causing your body to pack on the pounds. [1]

In this case, eliminating gluten and the inflammatory substances from food you eat, can actually eventually correctly tune your body into letting go of all the pounds it’s been saving for  a rainy day. Going gluten-free may actually help you lose weight. 

 

weight loss on a gluten free diet

3. The Ugly – Unadvisable weight gain

There is a third  route your body may take, on a gluten-free diet. If you do not have problems with severe weight loss from Celiac Disease, you may encounter another type of weight gain, that is not the desirable kind.

It may be the case that in your effort to remove gluten from your diet, you are in turn consuming a lot more processed foods with a whole lot of junk in them. A lot of gluten-free food are processed foods that can contain sugars, sodium, or additives, bad fats, and dairy in unhealthy amounts. Avoid the trap of ditching gluten, the one thing your body is reactive about, only to land on a whole pile of things that is in other ways very bad for you.

The trick would be to go naturally gluten-free. Or if you are eating processed food, know the ingredients in what you’re eating. Choose to take the fruit, instead of the gluten-free baked good with glaze and so much butter. For your main meal, get vegetables on the side in place of those gluten laden dinner rolls. Basically, be careful of the general content of your food, aside from the gluten content. This can help eliminate the unnecessary weight gain from adopting this new diet. 

Do you have your own experience to share on how going gluten free affected your weight? Feel free to share with us in the comments! 🙂

References:

“Gluten Sensitivity: Is It Possible To Be Overweight And Have A Gluten Problem?” Performance by Dr. Vikki Petersen, Gluten Sensitivity: Is It Possible To Be Overweight And Have A Gluten Problem?, YouTube, 6 May 2010, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l09pkn71vSo&t=0s&list=PLF-d5_BISpj0BGZ1ttOYnrxVjk3aFxBl9&index=2.

Gluten-Free At Home? How to Avoid Cross-Contamination if you’re the only one.

woman in a non gluten-free kitchen

It’s nice when all the members of the family or a household adhere to only one type of diet. It’s a whole ‘nother story if you’re a solo gluten-free dieter at home.

In a study made by the American Dietetic Association[1], it was  revealed that a number of  grains that are inherently gluten-free (7 of the 22 grains tested) came out actually having gluten above 20 parts per million–the limit that FDA has set for a product to be called gluten-free.

Hold it, what? How does this happen? That is because of cross-contamination. Gluten can contaminate non gluten-containing foods in its different phases of production: from harvest of ingredients in farms where gluten-containing foods are planted, manufacturing in plants where gluten-containing foods are also processed, or even in the bulk bins in stores where they are placed next to gluten-containing items.

man eating gluten free food

And so, it is an important thing to note that right at home,  cross-contamination may also happen.  Kitchens used to prepare food that contains gluten; cooking tools, toasters, ovens, dishwashers, may actually pose risks of contaminating the food you eat.

What to do to avoid gluten cross-contamination? Here are some handy tips! How strict you will implement these would depend on how reactive you are to gluten. If you have Celiac Disease, we advise ticking all items on the list. 

  1. Have dedicated cooking tools such as pots, pans, cutting board, toasters, and ovens for preparing gluten-free meals.

Young Unhappy Woman Opening Door Of Oven With Full Of Smoke

If what you use in the kitchen handle non-gluten containing foods, it is best to have its gluten-free version. Though it would not be that practical to have two of everything, especially big expensive appliances, you can opt to have smaller versions of it for your solo use, at a fraction of the cost. Or if you are throwing away an old oven for a new model, for example, but they actually still work, disinfect and keep them as your gluten-free safe one.

For smaller items, definitely do not scrimp. Tools that you have to be extra careful about are strainers, peelers, graters; those that commonly get food stuck in crevices, even after thorough washing. Be safe, and get a twin.

  1. Separate a section for gluten-free items in your pantry and cabinets, a separate shelf in your refrigerator, ideally the topmost.

ref shelf

Not border-lining on OCD, it actually makes sense to have 2 separate areas at home for gluten-free and non-gluten-free items. It will make cooking and eating a lot more convenient, as you wouldn’t always be digging through your pantry to find safe items every time. It would also stop gluten from sneaking their way into your meals  when stored.

  1. Choose stainless steel cutlery and tools for easy cleaning decontamination. Avoid wooden spoons.

We’re in love with wooden spoons. They’re pretty, are gentler on sensitive cookwares and there’s that organic mama-is-home feel to it. But they can also be a pain to clean, and we’re not exactly 100% sure they are food safe. These can crack overtime with heat and repeated use, and then gluten-containing food particles can get stuck in them, not to mention they can be a breeding ground for bacteria.

spoon silhouette

  1. Once a week (or more than once, if your family members are amenable) have a gluten-free day.

This is a day when you will only cook from your gluten-free pantry section, and no one is allowed to complain 😉

Your food safety relies heavily on the support system you can get from your household.  Aside from speaking to them directly about the health impact for you of being gluten-free, do this also with hope of them getting consciously more considerate of the real diet needs of other household members.

The meals that you will eat on this day will also show them gluten-free day food is actually not that different from their usual meals. If you cook with ingredients from scratch, a bonus would be adding less processed foods, and more natural ingredients to their diet (Since they’d also be eating no additives that may contain gluten).

  1.  And lastly, the mother of it all:  Have the entire household go gluten-free.

It’s not easy to get everyone on this special diet, but a gluten-free household is the surest way to avoid cross-contamination. When something is not gluten-free, drop it at the doorstep before coming in. It is worth it to have some inconveniences and adjustments in the beginning, when in the end, you can say on a daily basis that you are healthy and safe in your own house.

gluten free family

Any more tips that you do in your own home to avoid gluten cross-contamination? Feel free to leave some in the comments! 🙂

References:

[1] Thompson, T, et al. “Gluten Contamination of Grains, Seeds, and Flours in the United States: a Pilot Study.” Advances in Pediatrics., U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2010, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20497786.

7 Things You Never Thought Could be Gluten-Free

With wheat, barley and rye out of the picture, what do you eat? (Buh-bye, pizza, pasta, bread… and so much more.) We’ve scoured the internet for gluten-free food, and surprisingly found these products  that we never thought could be gluten-free. Not all these are available yet in the Philippines. But it’s nice to know there are creative ways out there by which the gluten-free community can still enjoy their favorite meals.

1. Gluten-Free Corn Dogs

This yummy bread and meat on a stick is typically made with cornflour and sadly, baking flour made of wheat. And so we thought we’d never see the day corn dogs off a shelf can be gluten-free.  Foster Farms Gluten-Free Corn Dogs, Chicken Franks Dipped in Honey-Cruchy batter: doesn’t that just sound delicious? And gluten-free, thank you very much.

gluten free corn dog
Photo: Fosterfarms.com

2. Gluten-Free Gravy

Feels a bit unfair that just because you cannot have gluten, delicious things such as gravy become forbidden. What with its usual wheat containing thickeners and flavorings. But McCormick created a solution so your sauces and meats do not have to go gravy-free. (Seriously, McCormick, you’re golden.). 

McCormick Gluten Free Gravy
Photo Credit: McCormick.com

3. Gluten-Free Couscous

Aside from pasta, which we already know  have gluten-free versions, Couscous also has a big red flag for the gluten-intolerant. A pasta like product which is a staple in the North African cuisine, it is traditionally made from crushed durum wheat. Woolworths the popular grocery store in Australia carry San Remo Gluten-Free Couscous. It’s made instead of corn flour and water. Add it to your vegetables meals, meats and fish. Cooks in only 9 minutes.

san remo gluten free couscous
Photo: San Remo
  1. Gluten-Free Whole Grain Bread

You don’t need wheat to get nutrition and tummy pleasant fiber from whole grain bread. Whole wheat breads are usual things we see in stores, but more types are actually out there.  Genuine Bavarian Breads brand makes gluten-free whole grain breads: organic whole flaxseed bread, whole grain bread made mostly of whole cereals and whole rice. These can be ordered from iHerb to ship to the Philippines via UPS, DHL or via local post. If you want other breads like whole loaf, baguette and sliced breads, we also know where you can get some

Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread
Photo: iHerb
  1. Gluten-Free Soy Sauce

You would think that soy sauce, soy being the operative word, should naturally be gluten-free. But lo and behold, the ingredients list of most soy sauce out there contain wheat in its primary ingredients. Even Kikkoman, the naturally brewed soysauce, still contains gluten in undetectable amount below 10 parts per million. For Gluten-Free soy sauce then, try the Tamari style soy sauce that don’t use wheat. Kikkoman also has it. FilStop may ship internationally to you. Or if you you don’t want to pay shipping charges to have soy sauce shipped, this Skinny Protein Aminos from 7grains available locally,  for your marinades, and dish seasonings.  

Gluten Free Soy Sauce Alternative
Photo: 7grains
  1.  Gluten-Free Pizza

We used to believe the only way you can have gluten-free pizza is to make it from scratch. But our good friends from Amy’s made these pizzas with rice crust for our enjoyment.

amy's gluten free pizza
Photo: Amy’s

Kroger also has these pizzas with fantastically extra thin crust made from tapioca starch, brown rice flour among other gluten-free ingredients.

  1. Gluten-Free Beer

For alcoholic beverages, we can have the gluten-free alternative, all the time. Wine, it’s called. But sometimes we really just want beer. Bad news for us since barley equals beer, right? Well, not all the time. Check Shape’s list of 12 Gluten Free Beers made from alternative ingredients like sorghum , gluten-less barley malt, hops, fruits, chestnuts. I’ll drink to that.

gluten free beer
Photo: Green Brewery

It’s fun finding out about these, isn’t it? Suddenly the gluten-free diet doesn’t seem at all that limited. Do you have your own Gluten-Free food discovery? Feel free to share with us in the comments!